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maj 6
Sunset, South Africa
Photograph by Giampiero Torello,
In the southern summer of 2012, I spent some weeks for work in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, together with my wife, and we used to take long walks on the beaches around the city in our spare time. One evening we came to a beach called Maitland, a large stretch of sand dunes.
I took a few photographs of the beach while a light wind was moving the sand and the sky was getting cloudy. Gradually the sea and the sky became first gray and then brown before the sun went down. It lasted just a few minutes, but luckily I had not yet finished the battery of my smartphone! I did nothing to this photograph; I was surprised myself but the sunset really looked like this. —Giampiero Torello
(via Sunset Picture — Landscape Wallpaper — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

Sunset, South Africa

Photograph by Giampiero Torello,

In the southern summer of 2012, I spent some weeks for work in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, together with my wife, and we used to take long walks on the beaches around the city in our spare time. One evening we came to a beach called Maitland, a large stretch of sand dunes.

I took a few photographs of the beach while a light wind was moving the sand and the sky was getting cloudy. Gradually the sea and the sky became first gray and then brown before the sun went down. It lasted just a few minutes, but luckily I had not yet finished the battery of my smartphone! I did nothing to this photograph; I was surprised myself but the sunset really looked like this. —Giampiero Torello

(via Sunset Picture — Landscape Wallpaper — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

maj 4
Tokai Forest, South Africa
Photograph by Penny R. Robartes, 
I woke up early to go take some photos of a haunted mansion in Tokai in Cape Town. I got lost down a dirt road of sorts and noticed how gorgeous the heavy mist looked as it hung low over Tokai forest. I went into the forest and was taking photographs when I saw a crow in the tree about to take off, so I aimed my camera to where I thought the crow would fly and captured it when it came into my frame. —Penny R. Robartes
 (via Forest Picture — Cape Town Photo — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

Tokai Forest, South Africa

Photograph by Penny R. Robartes,

I woke up early to go take some photos of a haunted mansion in Tokai in Cape Town. I got lost down a dirt road of sorts and noticed how gorgeous the heavy mist looked as it hung low over Tokai forest. I went into the forest and was taking photographs when I saw a crow in the tree about to take off, so I aimed my camera to where I thought the crow would fly and captured it when it came into my frame. —Penny R. Robartes

 (via Forest Picture — Cape Town Photo — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

The story here is quite interesting: “The subject pointed a shotgun at the victim’s face and stated ‘give me your money’. The victim disarmed the gunman and then chased him. Moments later the victim was approached by two black males in a black four door sedan. The driver of the vehicle said to the victim ‘give me my gun back and I’ll give you your phone that you dropped’. The victim then used the shotgun to strike the rear windshield of the vehicle causing it to break. The two subjects then fled…”

Miranda Castle or Chateau Miranda is a castle in Belgium. It was built in 1866 and was abandoned in 1991.

The Empress Dowager Cixi in sedan chair surrounded by eunuchs China Qing dynasty 1903-1904 

The Empress Dowager Cixi in sedan chair surrounded by eunuchs China Qing dynasty 1903-1904 

Farmhouse, Delaware

Photograph by Michael Melford

Painter Andrew Wyeth kept a secret studio a few miles from this Woodlawn farmhouse, creating works of art inspired by the surrounding landscape until his death in 2009. Some of his paintings evoke similar wintry scenes.
(via Farmhouse Picture — Weather Wallpaper — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

Farmhouse, Delaware

Photograph by Michael Melford

Painter Andrew Wyeth kept a secret studio a few miles from this Woodlawn farmhouse, creating works of art inspired by the surrounding landscape until his death in 2009. Some of his paintings evoke similar wintry scenes.

(via Farmhouse Picture — Weather Wallpaper — National Geographic Photo of the Day)

Shades Of Ratcliffe IV
(- Russ Barnes Photography)
Spurn Point where it was taken is a pretty harsh location, it’s windswept and lonely, on a now inhabited spit of land which is covered in vicious thorns and yet it has real natural beauty, something which I tried to accentuate in that image, giving it a dream state feel like you couldn’t wait to be there amongst the dunes. And people like that idea and view, they want to think their world is like this.
A lot of landscape photography pursues this idealistic view of the world, but it really isn’t like this of course. Ratcliffe Power Station is very much a case in point. Michael Kenna shot a magnificent series there and gave the Power Station what I consider to be a beautifully moody facade in his images - those Cooling Towers are after all magnificent feats of engineering which rise majestically into the sky. It’s probably very natural that we want to make them look the best we can, worshipping our own construction and achievements, they ARE beautiful after all, their shape, their presence. My last image of them below attempted to show them integrated like this in the environment, as wonderful as the trees and plants around them even.
But where our Coal Fired Power Stations are concerned the real world isn’t really like this. They are dirty, dangerous, invisibly polluting the environment, warming the atmosphere, they are burning through millions of tonnes of coal which has been savagely ripped from the earth. In fact we should probably do everything we can to switch off power stations like this quickly and reflect on what we’re really doing to the planet much deeper. So what if we should smash this ideal that these towers are anything but beautiful, that in fact they are symbols of our own downfall, of an age we should be turning our back on? And how do we break that mould artistically?
Well, I tried to take a step here and I intend to turn this into a series. I think it certainly achieved what I wanted this time anyway - dark, sinister, filthy, polluting, chemical, shrouded in threat and death. But still at least hopefully artistic. I’d be interested here who prefers the mono over this version and perhaps why…

Shades Of Ratcliffe IV

(- Russ Barnes Photography)

Spurn Point where it was taken is a pretty harsh location, it’s windswept and lonely, on a now inhabited spit of land which is covered in vicious thorns and yet it has real natural beauty, something which I tried to accentuate in that image, giving it a dream state feel like you couldn’t wait to be there amongst the dunes. And people like that idea and view, they want to think their world is like this.

A lot of landscape photography pursues this idealistic view of the world, but it really isn’t like this of course. Ratcliffe Power Station is very much a case in point. Michael Kenna shot a magnificent series there and gave the Power Station what I consider to be a beautifully moody facade in his images - those Cooling Towers are after all magnificent feats of engineering which rise majestically into the sky. It’s probably very natural that we want to make them look the best we can, worshipping our own construction and achievements, they ARE beautiful after all, their shape, their presence. My last image of them below attempted to show them integrated like this in the environment, as wonderful as the trees and plants around them even.

But where our Coal Fired Power Stations are concerned the real world isn’t really like this. They are dirty, dangerous, invisibly polluting the environment, warming the atmosphere, they are burning through millions of tonnes of coal which has been savagely ripped from the earth. In fact we should probably do everything we can to switch off power stations like this quickly and reflect on what we’re really doing to the planet much deeper. So what if we should smash this ideal that these towers are anything but beautiful, that in fact they are symbols of our own downfall, of an age we should be turning our back on? And how do we break that mould artistically?

Well, I tried to take a step here and I intend to turn this into a series. I think it certainly achieved what I wanted this time anyway - dark, sinister, filthy, polluting, chemical, shrouded in threat and death. But still at least hopefully artistic. I’d be interested here who prefers the mono over this version and perhaps why…

Tomb of the Prussian Royal Family

Tomb of the Prussian Royal Family

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